Fashionable History: Georgia O'Keefe

In the past month I've been surrounded by Georgia O'Keefe. And I've loved every minute of it!  In Santa Fe { see my post on New Mexico here } I went to the Georgia O'Keefe museum. A few days later, her home in Abiquiu. When I was back in Brooklyn I naturally went to the Brooklyn Museum's exhibit; Georgia O'Keefe Living Modern - which is in its final weeks! With all of this inspiration how could I not highlight her fashionable life which was the topic at the Brooklyn Musuem's exhibit. Georgia's public persona was always, at least to me anyway, very stark and serious. The more I learned at each of these museums, I began to see that she was actually quite the opposite. Locals in Abiquiu told us of her generosity and of her sense of humor. At the Living Modern exhibit you can see her Ferragamo shoes. She was simple but she had great taste. She was no fuss and full of determination but she also loved the finer things in life. Her adobe home in Abiquiu was tastefully decorated with the prime Mid-Century furniture of her time. It is possible to master the art of slow living and still be stylish. And she could afford it. Her paintings sold. She was not a starving artist. She was a master of optics, of image control taught to her by her husband, the famous photographer Alfred Stieglitz. If alive today she'd have all of the Instagram influencers beat! And, she made her own clothes, too. So there's that! 

georgiaokeefelivingmodern.jpg

This is my only taken by me shot at the exhibit Living Modern. Museum lighting is not the best for cell phone photos. However, this was my favorite wall. I loved the swirl of Georgia's sculpture (which she also had a version of in her house) duplicating the pattern on her kimono and also the photo of her in the background. 

Bruce Weber. 1984.

Bruce Weber. 1984.

Georgia was so graceful in her elder years. Here she is in the background photo from above. She is wearing a kimono and her silver Alexander Calder OK initial pin that she wore vertical so it didn't look too much like her initials, but rather more abstract. 

Ansel Adams. 1981.

Ansel Adams. 1981.

A better look at the Calder pin. Famous photographers flocked to her. 

Gavin Ashworth.

Gavin Ashworth.

Her famous wrap dress. You can see her wearing this or a version of it in many photos of Georgia in the New Mexico years. Circa 1960s/1970s. This was her uniform for several years and allowed her freedom of movement. Because she was surrounded by such color and magnificent landscapes in New Mexico she chose a simple black and white palette for her wardrobe. Occasionally she wore jeans, as she indicated it is what one does in the West. 

Alfred Stieglitz. 1918.

Alfred Stieglitz. 1918.

Alfred Stieglitz brought Georgia and her art to New York City. An image maker, he photographed her to create mystique, androgyny, progressive independence, and the persona that we often think of when we think of Georgia O'Keefe. Here is an early portrait of her wearing his infamous black cape the year she moved to New York. Her first museum exhibition was in 1927 at the Brooklyn Museum. 

Clearly, Georgia has left a lasting impression on the art scene, the fashion world, and in the hearts of Americans. After visiting "Georgia O'Keefe country" in New Mexico and visiting the amazing exhibit here in Brooklyn, I am even more inspired by, not just her artwork but also her magnitude and beauty. 

Iconic O'Keefe. I took this shot at her Abiquiu home in New Mexico. 

Iconic O'Keefe. I took this shot at her Abiquiu home in New Mexico. 

xo,
Karen

 


Image credits: Karen LaPorte and as indicated under each image. 

Afraid to miss out on future posts? Sign up for my newsletter or follow on bloglovin'