Bombshells: Jean Seberg

Jean Seberg went from Iowa to becoming the French New Wave's darling.  While she made movies in Hollywood as well, it is her portrayal of the cool girly-tomboy young American in her French movies that have always inspired me.

She acted from the years of 1957-1976. Her first movie was Otto Preminger's Saint Joan, where she played Joan of Arc. She died in 1979 of an overdose at the age of 40. 

She made the pixie cut chic, well before Mia Farrow. 

Her chicness was in her ability to shine without being over done. 

Capris, chunky knit sweaters, and flats. This was her uniform.

She was truly adorable!

If you haven't seen her in the New Wave classic,

Breathless

(1960), you simply must! 

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Rockaway Beach

Winter Fashion By Decade- 1960's

This is my last installment of the Winter Fashion By Decade series. I am going to end it with the 1960's! I hope you have enjoyed the series. If you haven't been following along, click on the following decades to see the changes over time! 1920's1930's1940's, and 1950's.

Winter sports are still increasing in popularity. It is now really important to be fashionable on the slopes! How great is this pink ski suit? 

Large houndstooth- look closely- this is knitted! 

Pierre Cardin! Fur trim is now getting smaller than we have seen in previous decades but it's still important. Plus the mod influence is really strong here.

Why save your fur for the outerwear. Fur trimmed suits are popular.

As well as fur accessories! Again, not as extravagant as the 1920's but this is from a 1960's Sear's catalog. Meaning- it's affordable and accessible to many more people.

I love those fur shawl collar cardigans

Which decade is your favorite? Only a few weeks of winter left...look fab!


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xo,

Karen 

Bombshells: 1960's Yé Yé Girls

In the 1960's, Yé Yé was a movement in France mostly based on youth and pop music being produced at the time. The term derived from "Yeah Yeah" and was a reaction to Mod in England and Rock 'n' Roll and Girl Groups popular in the States. Pulled by Svengali strings, most notably, from famed songwriter Serge Gainsbourg, several hits were produced. 

The popular Yé Yé girls of France were sexy in a naive way and most often sang songs of innocence with undertones of sexuality and even sadness. France was, after all, still recovering from the War and the youth had a very different reality than those in America. Yé Yé Girls have always been an inspiration to me. I love the music and the Nouvelle Vague movies from this time period in France. I love their style too! Unlike their American counterparts, think Motown, these girls have Gallic pouts and slightly disheveled hair with bangs. They were not overly styled. 

Françoise Hardy

That face! Françoise's career is still going strong. She is probably the most popular of the Yé Yé girls. Her style has often been imitated. 

francoise hardy, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
francoise hardy, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
francoise hardy, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells

Chantal Goya

Chantal is adorable! She also starred in Jean-Luc Goddard's

Masculin Féminin

which is full of great fashion and French ennui. 

chantal goya, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
chantal goya, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
chantal goya, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells

France Gall

France was 16 when her first single got airplay. 

France Gall, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
France Gall, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
France Gall, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells

Sylvie Vartan

Sylvie brought more rock 'n' roll to the genre and had a tougher sound than her peers. She even married French Rock Star, Johnny Hallyday. They were the "it" couple of the time. 

sylvie vartan, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
sylvie vartan, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells
sylvie vartan, ye ye girls, bobbins and bombshells

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xo,

Karen 

Guest Post: Pete's Mad Men Wet Set Series / Peggy

Pete from Incurlers is back! You may remember his previous posts; Here and Here;  on wet sets for vintage hairstyles. I recently asked him to give us some insight into Mad Men era hairstyles. In this three part series, Pete explores the hairstyles of Betty, Joan, and Peggy as they would have looked from the pages of 1960's Good Housekeeping magazines!

Take it away, Pete: 

When Karen suggested I do a Mad Men hairstyle article, I thought it would be quite easy. Just look though some old magazines in my collection, pick out some hairdos similar to what the main characters wear and my work would be mostly done.  Not having having seen an episode of Mad Men in over a year, I set out to do just that and was quite pleased with what I found. That is, until I looked at some pictures from the show and while the hairdos I had selected were similar, they were not identical to what is actually used on the show. Even with a bit more research my original choices did not change, so these articles are about the hairstyles that Betty, Joan, and Peggy might have worn had they been reading Good Housekeeping (GH) or any similar magazine as many women would have done at the time.

Peggy Olson




In spite of her ambition, Peggy always seems slightly less elegant than either Betty or Joan.  Somehow this hairstyle seems to really fit her character and, of all three hairdos, this is the one that is most stereotypical of the 60s. 
(Photos below from GH Nov. 1964)


And the instructions from almost 50 years ago:


"Tease top and sides, then brush to back crown. Fluff bangs forward, blending side ends upward toward crown. Now place hand behind crown and push teased hair forward for rounded height. Discretely tucked hairpins at lower crown will secure ends. Comb back down, flip ends up over hand. Twirl side tips out. "  (GH Nov. 1964) 

The trickiest thing here is teasing, which in spite of what the instructions say, probably applies more toward the back, and is not completely necessary if you don’t want as much volume.  Instead of trying to explain teasing, the best thing is to watch it being done. A quick Google search brought up this YouTube video  which is a pretty good demonstration.  More than either of the other two hairdos in this series, this hairdo requires careful combing of you hair into the desired shape and strong hairspray to keep it that way (which is also so authentically 1960s). This page has an interesting discussion of hairspray (and lacquer!)  that is very appropriate for this style. 

***

I hope you enjoyed this glimpse into the past. Since these photos and instructions are taken from vintage 1960s Good Housekeeping magazines, thousands or even millions of women in the 1960s would have actually duplicated and worn these exact hairdos. It doesn’t get more authentically vintage than that! 

The advice I always give is, it does take practice and experimentation to get good at any vintage technique or successfully create a vintage hairdo, so try these hairdos a number of times at home when the results really aren’t that important so you can simply wash them out if thing don’t work out as you had hoped. And above all, have fun trying some authentic vintage hairdos.

***

Thank you Pete for this lovely series! 

In case you missed it, check out Betty and Joan! 

 For more vintage hair style fun, read Pete's blog; Incurlers and follow him on Twitter @incurlers

Guest Post: Pete's Mad Men Wet Set Series / Joan

Pete from Incurlers is back! You may remember his previous posts; Here and Here; on wet sets for vintage hairstyles. I recently asked him to give us some insight into Mad Men era hairstyles. In this three part series, Pete explores the hairstyles of Betty, Joan, and Peggy as they would have looked from the pages of 1960's Good Housekeeping magazines! 

 Take it away, Pete: 

 When Karen suggested I do a Mad Men hairstyle article, I thought it would be quite easy. Just look though some old magazines in my collection, pick out some hairdos similar to what the main characters wear and my work would be mostly done.  Not having having seen an episode of Mad Men in over a year, I set out to do just that and was quite pleased with what I found. That is, until I looked at some pictures from the show and while the hairdos I had selected were similar, they were not identical to what is actually used on the show. Even with a bit more research my original choices did not change, so these articles are about the hairstyles that Betty, Joan, and Peggy might have worn had they been reading Good Housekeeping (GH) or any similar magazine as many women would have done at the time.

Joan Harris 




Joan, as office manager, has a more formal look to her. This might have been her style.
 (Photos below from GH Nov.1963)


And the instructions from the article:

"Make a 3-inch part at right side. Draw right side sleekly back and secure at crown. Fold left and top hair over back of head to shape it into circlet shown, covering right side hairpins. Secure strategically with fine hairpins.  Draw forelock across left brow to ear. Spray lavishly to hold. " (GH Nov. 1963)

Like Betty’s hairdo, medium larger rollers are used to add volume and, if you hair is naturally wavy, straighten it bit as well. The instructions sound amazingly complicated, but in the end all they are saying is comb you hair into the style shown in the photograph and pin into place, hiding the pins as best as possible. 


***


I hope you enjoyed this glimpse into the past. Since these photos and instructions are taken from vintage 1960s Good Housekeeping magazines, thousands or even millions of women in the 1960s would have actually duplicated and worn these exact hairdos. It doesn’t get more authentically vintage than that! 

The advice I always give is, it does take practice and experimentation to get good at any vintage technique or successfully create a vintage hairdo, so try these hairdos a number of times at home when the results really aren’t that important so you can simply wash them out if thing don’t work out as you had hoped. And above all, have fun trying some authentic vintage hairdos.

***

Thank you Pete!

Stay tuned for Peggy, next week!

 For more vintage hair style fun, read Pete's blog; Incurlers or follow him on Twitter @incurlers

Guest Post: Pete's Mad Men Wet Set Series / Betty

Pete from Incurlers is back! You may remember his previous posts; Here and Here;  on wet sets for vintage hairstyles. I recently asked him to give us some insight into Mad Men era hairstyles. In this three part series, Pete explores the hairstyles of Betty, Joan, and Peggy as they would have looked from the pages of 1960's Good Housekeeping magazines!

Take it away, Pete: 

When Karen suggested I do a Mad Men hairstyle article, I thought it would be quite easy. Just look though some old magazines in my collection, pick out some hairdos similar to what the main characters wear and my work would be mostly done.  Not having having seen an episode of Mad Men in over a year, I set out to do just that and was quite pleased with what I found. That is, until I looked at some pictures from the show and while the hairdos I had selected were similar, they were not identical to what is actually used on the show. Even with a bit more research my original choices did not change, so these articles are about the hairstyles that Betty, Joan, and Peggy might have worn had they been reading Good Housekeeping (GH) or any similar magazine as many women would have done at the time.


Betty Draper/Francis




This beautiful yet simple everyday style is what Betty might have worn as a housewife who's fashionable appearance was very important to her self image.
  (Photos below from GH Nov.1963).


Like almost all hairdos of that period, it was done with a wet set and Good Housekeeping provided both a setting pattern, instructions and advice: 


"Brush all hair back; let sides come forward. Push in shallow dips at temples and ears; hold as you brush sides and back smooth close to the head. Cup all ends under. A soothing creme rinse after shampooing helps tame flyaway hair." (GH Nov.1963)

The main thing to point out here is that this hairdo uses medium or larger rollers to add volume, and you don’t need to be overly concerned with setting you hair perfectly since it will be mostly the brushing (or combing) that will be used to create the final shape. 

***

I hope you enjoyed this glimpse into the past. Since these photos and instructions are taken from vintage 1960s Good Housekeeping magazines, thousands or even millions of women in the 1960s would have actually duplicated and worn these exact hairdos. It doesn’t get more authentically vintage than that! 

The advice I always give is, it does take practice and experimentation to get good at any vintage technique or successfully create a vintage hairdo, so try these hairdos a number of times at home when the results really aren’t that important so you can simply wash them out if thing don’t work out as you had hoped. And above all, have fun trying some authentic vintage hairdos.

***

Thank you Pete! I am inspired to try this!

Stay tuned for Joan, next week!
 For more vintage hair style fun, read Pete's blog; Incurlers or follow him on Twitter @incurlers


Retro Looks in the Modern World: Mannequin Thriller

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Miu Miu Resort 2013

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.


I love the 60's vibe on the sets of the Resort 2013 Miu Miu campaign. The collection and accessories are wonderful too. Love the hair bows! 

Shot by Steven Meisel. 







via: fashiongonerogue.com

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Moving Picture

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.

Inspired by movie stills this editorial from The Block S/S 2012 gives us wonderful 1960s looks and retro hair! 

Model: Kate Wagoner
Photographer: Victor Demarchelier





via: fashiongonerogue.com

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Vogue Italia



As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.


In the May 2012 issue of Vogue Italia, Summer looks are inspired from a mixture of past eras. 1920's Flapper, and Classic Era looks are mixed with 1970's cars and floppy hats. A Summer ode to the 20th Century.

Models: Karlina Caune and Monika Sawicka
Photographer: KT Auleta






via: fashiongonerogue.com

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Hotel, Motel

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.

Retro lingerie is paired with Dolce & Gabbana, Prada, and Miu Miu in this retro California dessert hotel editorial for Grazia Germany. 

Model: Rachel Alexander
Photographer: Leo Krumbacher






via fashiongonerogue.com

Retro Looks In The Modern World: American Dream

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.


Glamourous errands and chores in 1960's looks are the focus in this editorial from Fashion Quarterly New Zealand. 

Model: Penny Pickard
Photographer: Steven Chee






via fashiongonerogue.com

Bombshells: Here's To You, Mrs. Robinson

I recently watched one of my favorite films, The Graduate (1967), again. Anne Bancroft who plays Mrs. Robinson has long been one of my style idols. Today, I'm focusing on the many animal print ensembles she wears through out the film. Clever choice, I might add,  for the predatory seductress she plays. 

Vanity Fair leopard bra and half slip, perhaps? 

Leopard collar and hat, at her Daughter's wedding. 

Amazing leopard coat! 

Giraffe skirt! 

The coat again, I can't get enough of it! 

Retro Looks In The Modern World: The Most Important Thing About Dreams Is Having One

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.

Model Abbey Lee Kershaw channels Twiggy in this 1960's MOD inspired spread for i-D Fall 2011. Oversized accessories add a surrealistic and playful touch. 
Photographer: Richard Bush




Those Prada boots! I love them! 



Source: fashiongonerogue.com

Retro Looks in the Modern World: A Family Portrait

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time.
Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.

I love this spread from the August issue of Vogue Italia. With a 60's influence, the roles with this Mother/ Daughter duo are reversed in a very stylish way!
Model: Bianca Balti
Photographer: Miles Aldridge







images via fashiongonerogue.com

Bombshells: Anna Karina

Anna Karina has been an inspiration of mine for a very long time. The Danish actress gained fame in the 1960s starring in several French New Wave films. Her brunette bangs and cat lined eyes is a look I have always fallen back on over the years. Growing up a skinny awkward brunette, when I discovered the French New Wave as a teen I was in heaven. Anna's art house look seemed way more achievable to me then the Bardot's and other blonde icons of her time and mine, who's looks I love but could never emulate. Here are some lovely pictures of Anna Karina to get you through the mid-week!

Retro Looks In The Modern World: Vogue Italia

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.
Here is Christy Turlington in the July 2010 issue of Vogue Italia wearing gorgeous 1960's inspired evening wear. The style of her modeling is also 60's style.
Photographed by Steven Meisel.








Source: fashiongonerogue.com


Retro Looks In The Modern World: Numero 112

As much as the modern fashion world looks forward it also continually looks back in time. Here we explore Retro Looks in the Modern World.
This week I have discovered this adorable editorial from April's Numero 112.
I love the cute Italian 1960's vibe.
Model: Rasa Zukauskaite
Photographer: Val & Musso









images via fashiongonerogue.com

Bobbins: Mary Quant

Mary Quant was one of the most prolific designers of the 1960's MOD and Chelsea Girl look. She popularized and made mini skirts, go-go boots, fashion tights, plastic PVC raincoats, and hot pants available to the masses.

She was famous for bold graphics, unusual color combinations, and the Vidal Sassoon 5 point bob hairdo.

The famous floral motif.

Her shop on King's Road, named Bazaar, was a hot spot in Swinging London. It not only featured her easy to wear afordable clothing, tights, boots, and make-up, but also must see window displays.

Jean Shrimpton modeling a Mary Quant dress.


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xo,

Karen